Please_Be_Patient_Student_Driver_Magnet_Design

Most teens are very excited when first learning to drive. With their emotions operating at maximum, they’re sure to remember driving lessons with mom or dad for decades to come.

Make these memories good ones! Understand how to BEST teach your little road warrior confidence when driving and how to overcome his or her fears, while not pulling your hair out. Patience is key, but follow these few steps and you’ll be home free before you know it.

When Your Student Driver Turns 15

Start them out by finding and taking an Online Driver’s Ed Course. Start exploring (or have your child start exploring) the various online drivers’ education courses available by your state. The courses cover a series of online lessons that take the student through the state’s driver’s handbook.

DMV NV
You must pass the knowledge test for a license or endorsement before you schedule the skills test.
We do not make appointments for license applications, vision or knowledge tests. Skills tests are administered by appointment or on a stand-by basis.

Use our Online Drive Test Scheduling System if you have an instruction permit and have met all of the requirements to take a skills test. Online scheduling is available for non-commercial Class C (autos) and Class M (motorcycles) licenses.

All Commercial Drivers License tests and transactions must be completed at a CDL office.

Knowledge (Written) Test | Try our Online Sample Quiz!
Interactive Javascript | Text Only

FEES
The DMV charges a Testing Fee of $26 for a first-time knowledge and skills test and $11 for all retests. The initial fee covers both written and drive tests for any combination of license classes or endorsements that are paid for at the same time. This fee is in addition to other licensing fees.

Certain medically-required tests are exempt. See Driver License Fees. There is no charge for vision tests.

Prepare Your Son or Daughter for Their First Time Driving

The best place to start driving lessons is in an empty parking lot. Business parking lots tend to be deserted on the weekends. It’s in the empty parking lot where you build a solid foundation of driving skills. There, he or she will get used to the pedals, gears, parking brake, gear shift, mirrors, seat height, and more. Familiarization with the car itself and moving it along a road and a curb, turning and stopping is enough to familiarize with before moving to a street full of bad drivers, distracted pedestrians and street lights.

Help Them Understand the Ways of The Road

Teen driving stress comes from their inexperience. Help them understand how space and time interact as they drive by using these time rules. Again, an empty parking lot is the best place to practice the following rules:

  • The 2-Second Rule: Student drivers should always stay at least two seconds behind the driver in front. To gauge whether or not your car has safe trailing distance, you both can watch the car in front pass a stop sign and then count “one-one-thousand, two-one-thousand.”
  • The 4-Second Rule: Student drivers should be able to stop within four seconds, even at speeds over 60 miles per hour. Experiment with your student and count “one-one-thousand, two-one-thousand, three -one-thousand, four-one-thousand” as you come to a stop. As you pass four-one-thousand, are you at the point you expected to be?
  • The 12-Second Rule: Drivers should be aware of their surroundings to the extent that they’re driving to accommodate for anything they may reach within 12 seconds. Drivers should scan the scene and be ready to adjust speed and position for pedestrians, traffic lights, other cars, and more that they may reach within twelve seconds.

Review Your Attitude as The Teacher

Be open and share with them what they should be doing and what they are doing correctly, rather than just what they’re doing incorrectly. Refrain from constantly correcting. When they’re moving along nicely, signaling at the right time, and estimating appropriate stopping distance, put those successes into words. They need to internalize proper movements and choices as much as unwise ones.

The tried and true “Smith System” helps student drivers know what they SHOULD be doing with their eyes. It’s tenants include:

  • Watch the horizon, but keep your eyes moving
  • Avoid staring at one point for too long
  • Try be aware of whether other cars can see you
  • Consider what you would do should the car in front turn suddenly, stop suddenly, or make any number of other unexpected movements
  • Watch other cars and draw conclusions on what they may do

Suggesting all of these at once can overwhelm the new driver. Try to work them in over the six months you have while training your child.

Remind the student that driving can be stressful for a year or more. No one expects the student to be an excellent driver right away. They have a “provisional” license even for the year after they get the license because they’re still in training.

Set small, realistic goals that can be achieved reasonably quickly.

Use Your Words:

Plan some words you’ll use to get the desired results.Will you use “stop” or “brake?”

Consider narrating what’s going on ahead as you drive along. Saying “light turning yellow,” “car slowing ahead,” and more can help get the student driver to develop his or her own way of navigating the many things going on at once. Try to say these things in a calm voice, however.

Utilize silence. If the trip is going along well, don’t always jump in with instructions. Give them the control.

Don’t yell: although this is easier said than done.

Save More Challenging Driving Practice for Later

As you and your student driver moved from the empty business park parking lot to the neighborhood streets, driving tasks became more complex. Experts caution parents to keep their drivers in training in the neighborhoods for three to five months before bringing on the tough stuff. You may even want to wait until after your child has passed the behind-the-wheel driving test at the DMV and has earned a provisional license before venturing into these tests. Making a left on a green light only when no oncoming traffic exists

  • Merging into traffic from the on-ramp on the highway
  • Changing lanes on the highway
  • Merging onto the carpool lane on the highway
  • Driving in harsh weather conditions (slowly build up with light rain and snow first)
  • Driving at dusk when the sun interferes with line of sight
  • Riding with passengers (illegal until driver moves beyond provisional license at 17. AFTER ONE FULL YEAR DRIVING ALONE. NO FRIENDS IN THE CAR).

Review When Mistakes Happen

When you and your teen experience a near-collision, traffic-light-run-through or any other heart-stopping event (which you will), take time to debrief on the event. Particularly if you or your teen was yelling and your pulses were racing, it’s best to leave traffic and calm down. Go over what exactly happened; what you saw and what your teen saw. Talk about why he or she made those choices. Talk about “next time” and what to do instead.

At Last!

Your teen is behind the wheel and before you know it, driving to his or her activities and social events, independently. Success! For you and your son or daughter.

Now You Can Teach the Next Generation About Quality Car Care

For your convenience, the gas pumps at all of our Sierra Car Care locations are open 24/7. Our tire warehouse MST Tire Center is stocked full – ready for the winter. We are a local business serving local customers in Reno and Sparks as well as our surrounding communities. At Sierra Car Care & MST Tire Centers we’re passionate about our service!

DMV NV

Related Article

Advertisements